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Can Apple News Take Down Facebook, Snapchat, and Flipboard?

By Amanda Walgrove June 8th, 2015

Apple’s developers don’t want you going to Facebook for your news. Or Snapchat. Or Flipboard. In fact, they don’t even want you going to their old Newsstand app.

Instead, they’re throwing dirt in the faces of their competitors and scrapping their old product to make room for News, a sleek new reader app for iOS 9.

“News brings you the stories you love, beautifully designed, all in one place. Personalized for you,” Apple’s WWDC live blog reads.

 

 Can Apple News Take Down Facebook, Snapchat, and Flipboard?

Well, where have we heard that before? Is it A) Facebook’s new Instant Articles platform, B) Snapchat’s Discover feature, or C) Flipboard, the digital magazine that mobile users can customize with stories from their favorite publications? You know the answer. It’s D) All of the above.

Despite the stiff competition, Apple now hopes to deliver “the best mobile reading experience ever.” The tech giant has already teamed up with top tier publishers such as The New York Times (which is creating Instant Articles for Facebook as well) , BuzzFeed (also using Instant Articles), Wired, and Vanity Fair to provide content for the mobile app.

 Can Apple News Take Down Facebook, Snapchat, and Flipboard?

Each media outlet will have its own channel within the News app, offering users an opportunity to search and favorite different topics and publications relevant to their interests. And the more you interact with News, the more it learns about you. As a result, the app will be able to create a personalized feed of curated articles based on your interests. Users can also customize the layout of stories so that their multimedia and reading experiences are seamless on mobile devices.

According to Re/code, publishers will keep 100 percent of the advertising revenue they sell within the app. As for publishers that already have their own apps available for download through the App Store, Apple will continue to take a 30 percent cut of revenue from those subscriptions.

Apple’s News app will launch later this year in the U.S., U.K., and Australia. But before then, we shouldn’t be surprised if three more social networks and/or tech companies announce their own digital publishing experiments. That may be scary for Apple, but it’s not a bad thing for the general public, who will have more than enough options to choose from when deciding how they want to consume the news.

Image by Apple
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